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Introduction

A total of 34 states have laws requesting or requiring voters to show some form of identification at the polls, all of which are in force in 2018. Scroll over the map below for state-by state details.

The remaining 16 states use other methods to verify the identity of voters. Most frequently, other identifying information provided at the polling place, such as a signature, is checked against information on file.

Please note that the information contained on this page contains information on the current, in-effect laws. A chronology of voter ID legislation since 2000.

Proponents see increasing requirements for identification as a way to prevent in-person voter impersonation and increase public confidence in the election process. Opponents say there is little fraud of this kind, and the burden on voters unduly restricts the right to vote and imposes unnecessary costs and administrative burdens on elections administrators.

Please Note:  The following information is provided for background information only. Salsa the Vote is unable to assist in or offer advice on specific individual voter ID needs. We recommend that anyone interested in obtaining specific information on state voter ID requirements contact election officials in the jurisdiction where the person wishes to register and vote. To find contact information for your local election official click here.

Where to Vote

Cast Your Vote

You can cast your vote in local, state and federal elections in several ways.

  • Vote in person at a polling place or polling station
  • Vote by mail if you are unable to go to your registered polling station because you are temporarily living in another place, are in the military, or are overseas.
  • Many states offer early voting so you can avoid the lines on Election Day. More than two-thirds of the states--37, plus the District of Columbia--offer some sort of early voting. Early voting allows voters to visit an election official’s office or, in some states, other satellite voting locations, and cast a vote in person without offering an excuse for why the voter is unable to vote on Election Day. Some states also allow voters to receive, fill out and cast their absentee ballot in person at the elections office or at a satellite location rather than returning it through through the mail. This is often reffered to as in-person absentee voting. Satellite voting locations vary by state, and may include other county and state offices (besides the election official’s office), grocery stores, shopping malls, schools, libraries, and other locations. More detailed information can be found on NCSL's State Laws Governing Early Voting page.

Cast Your Vote at a Polling Place or Polling Station

Polling locations are assigned by residential address. It is important that you go to your assigned location since your name will not be on the roster at any other location. Your polling place may change from one election to the next, so check before you go to vote.

Find Out Where to Vote

Follow Here to Contact your State Election Office for the most updated information on your polling place and hours, or to request an accommodation.